Connect with us

Biography

Biography of Ladoke Akintola

Published

on

Samuel Ládòkè Akíntọ́lá or “S.L.A.”(July 6, 1910 – January 15, 1966) was a Nigerian politician, lawyer, aristocrat and orator who was born in Ogbomosho, south west Nigeria. In addition to serving as one of the founding fathers of modern Nigeria, he also served as the Oloye Aare Ona Kakanfo XIII of the Yoruba.

After he was trained as a lawyer in the United Kingdom, Akintola returned to Nigeria in 1949 and teamed up with other educated Nigerians from the Western Region to form the Action Group (AG) under the leadership of Chief Obafemi Awolowo. As the deputy leader of the AG party, he did not serve in the regional Western Region Government headed by the premier Awolowo but was the Action Group Parliamentary Leader/Leader of Opposition in the House of Representatives of Nigeria. At the federal level he served as Minister for Health and later Minister for Communications and Aviation.

Samuel Ladoke Akintola: Teacher, Lawyer, Politician and Orator

In late 1959 in preparation for Nigeria’s independence, the Action Group party took a decision which affected the career of Akintola, the party and Nigeria when the party asked him to swap political positions with Awolowo by becoming the premier of the Western Region while Awolowo who also was the national leader of the AG, would became the party leader in the Federal House of Representatives as well as the Opposition leader in the House.

The division of roles in the Western Nigeria government led to a conflict between SLA and Awolowo; the AG party broke into two factions leading to several crises in the Western Region House of Assembly that led the central/federal government, headed by the Prime Minister Sir Abubakar Tafawa Balewa to declare State of Emergency rule in the Western region and an Administrator was appointed. After a lengthy court battle, SLA was restored to power as Premier in 1963 and won in general election of 1965 not as member of the Action Group party but as the leader of a newly formed party called Nigerian National Democratic Party (NNDP) which was in an alliance with the Northern People’s Congress (NPC) the party that then controlled the federal government.

Read About Nigeria Various Culture and Traditions

Along with many other leading politicians, Akintola was assassinated in Ibadan the capital of Western Region on January 15, 1966 during the first military coup. The coup also terminated Nigeria’s First Republic.

SLA was married to Chief Faderera Abeke Akintola. They had five children, two of whom were finance ministers in Nigeria’s Third Republic (Chief Yomi Akintola and Dr Bimbo Akintola). Chief Yomi Akintola served as Nigeria’s Ambassador to Hungary and SLA’s daughter-in-law, Mrs. Dupe Akintola is Nigeria’s High Commissioner in Jamaica. His fourth child, Chief Victor Ladipo Akintola, dedicated much of his life to ensuring the continued accurate accounting of SLA’s contributions to Nigeria’s position on the world stage. Chief S L Akintola’s youngest son, the late Tokunbo Akintola, was the first black schoolboy at Eton College, enrolling two terms prior to the arrival of Dilibe Onyeama (author of Nigger at Eton). Many institutions, including Ladoke Akintola University of Technology, Ogbomosho were established in his home town and other Nigerian cities to remember him. Above all he practiced law.

See The first Nigerian Armed Robber that was Killed Publicly

Samuel Ladoke Akintola,  (born July 10, 1910, Ogbomosho, Nigeria—died January 14, 1966, Ibadan, Nigeria), administrator and politician, premier of the Western Region of Nigeria and an early victim of the January 1966 military coup.Like many other African nationalists Akintola was a teacher in the 1930s and early 1940s and a member of the Baptist Teachers’ Union and the Nigerian Youth Movement. He left teaching to study public administration and law in England and returned to Nigeria in 1950. He became a legal adviser to the Action Group, the dominant Western Region party, and by 1954 was deputy leader under Obafemi Awolowo. He was simultaneously active in the federal government; he became minister of labour in 1952 and later held the portfolios of health, communications, and aviation.

In 1959 Akintola became premier of the Western Region, coming to be recognised as a representative of conservative, business-oriented interests, who was content to concentrate party efforts on the region—in diametrical opposition to Awolowo’s growing interest in democratic socialism and to his attempt to win minority tribe votes in the North. In mid-1962 Awolowo’s supporters repudiated Akintola as a party leader and had him replaced as premier. The Northern-dominated federal government, however, hostile to Awolowo, declared a state of emergency in the region and restored Akintola to his post (1963). He formed the Nigerian National Democratic Party but was never able to win the votes of the majority of the region. His blatantly rigged election in 1965 was undoubtedly an immediate cause of the January 1966 coup in which he was slain.

Drop Your Comments Below

Biography

Biography of Soji Apampa

Published

on

Soji Apampa co-founded The Convention on Business Integrity in 1997. He is a Governance Consultant/Executive Director for both INTEGRITY and The Convention on Business Integrity. Mr. Apampa has served as a Senior Advisor to the UN Global Compact on the 10th Principle (anti-corruption) and consultant to the Inter-Agency Task Team of the Federal Republic of Nigeria tasked with the responsibility of developing a National Strategy to Combat Corruption.

Read About Nigeria Various Culture and Traditions

In his role as governance consultant, Mr. Apampa has carried out numerous assignments for various International Organizations including the World Bank, DFID, UN Global Compact, Heinrich Boell Foundation and many others. Mr. Apampa has also worked in various roles in engineering, business and computing between 1987 and 2007. He was Managing Director of SAP Nigeria Ltd, and Regional Manager (West Africa), for SAP where he worked for 8 years since early 1999 championing ICT-supported governance reforms.

Read More Nigeria Biographies

Mr. Apampa graduated with a B.Eng (Hons) in Civil & Structural Engineering from the University of Sheffield in 1987 and holds an MSc. in Governance & Finance from Liverpool John Moores University (2008) where he was member of faculty on the Corporate Governance Masters Programme at the European Center for Corporate Governance for one year. His research interests are in the area of Corporate Compliance and Political Economy Analyses in which he has led numerous, successful research projects.

Drop Your Comments Below

Continue Reading

Biography

Biography of Benjamin Adekunle

Published

on

Adekunle was born in Kaduna. His father was a native of Ogbomosho, while his mother was a member of the Bachama tribe. He underwent secondary education at the government college, Okene (in present day Kogi State). He enlisted in the Nigerian Army in 1958 shortly after completing his school certificate examinations. He passed the army selection examinations and thereafter was despatched to the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst in the UK, the British Army’s initial officer entry academy. He was commissioned 2nd Lieutenant on December 15, 1960. As a platoon commander, he served in Kasai Province of Congo with the 1st Battalion, Queen’s Own Nigeria Regiment during his first ONUC UN peace keeping tour of duty. In 1962, Lt. Adekunle became Aide-de-Camp to the governor of the eastern region, Sir Akanu Ibiam. The following year, as a Captain, he was posted back to the Congo as Staff Captain (A) to the Nigerian Brigade HQ at Luluabourg – under Brigadier B. Ogundipe. In 1964, Major Adekunle attended the Defence Services Staff College at Wellington, in India. When he returned he was briefly appointed Adjutant General at the Army Headquarters in May 1965 to replace Lt. Col. Yakubu Gowon, who was proceeding on a course outside the country. However, he later handed over the position to Lt. Col. James Pam and was posted back to his old Battalion (1st Bn) in Enugu as a Company Commander.

Nigerian Civil War

Adekunle later assumed command of the Lagos Garrison as a substantive Lt. Col. When the Nigerian Civil War erupted in July 1967, Adekunle was tasked to lead elements which included two new battalions (7th and 8th) – to conduct the historic sea borne assault on Bonny in the Bight of Benin on 26 July 1968 (carried out by Major Isaac Adaka Boro’s unit). This happened after the federal government gained confidence of most south western ethnic groups as a direct result of Biafran push to mid-west state and probe into Western region. Adekunle was promoted to Colonel after the Bonny landing.

See The Speech that Ended “BIAFRA WAR”

The 6th (under Major Jalo) and 8th (under Major Ochefu) battalions of the Lagos Garrison subsequently took part in operations to liberate the Midwest following the Biafran invasion of August 1967. The 7th (under Major Abubakar) stayed behind to hold Bonny. Because Major Jalo’s outfit was seconded to Lt. Col. Murtala Mohammed‘s 2nd Division, Adekunle was left with only the 8th Battalion at Escravos. He, therefore, protested to Army HQ and got the Lagos garrison upgraded to Brigade status through the creation of the 31 and 32 Battalions (under Majors Aliyu and Hamman, respectively). This formation, combined with elements of the Lagos garrison along the eastern seaboard, was officially designated the 3 Infantry Division.

Read About Nigeria Various Culture and Traditions

However, Colonel Adekunle did not think the name “3 Infantry Division” was sensational enough nor did it project the nature of the unique terrain in which his men had to fight. Therefore, without formal approval from Army HQ, he renamed it the ” 3 Marine Commando (3MCDO).” The “Black Scorpion” as he came to be known, was easily the most controversial, celebrated and mythologized figure in the war of attrition that laid the foundations for Nigeria’s contemporary crisis; and threw a wedge into the national fabric. Benjamin “Adekunle’s boys in the Midwest seized Escravos, Burutu, Urhonigbe, Owa and Aladima. They captured Bomadi and Patani, Youngtown, Koko, Sapele, Ajagbodudu, Warri, Ughelli, Orerokpe, Umutu and Itagba.

Role after the civil war

Benjamin Adekunle was promoted to Brigadier-General in 1972. After the war Adekunle was put in charge of decongesting the Lagos port that was having a chronic problem of clearing imported goods. He held this position until being put on compulsory retirement. On August 20, 1974, he was compulsorily retired from the Army.

Read More Nigeria Biographies

He attributed his problems during and after the war to his rivals in the army. In various interviews, he said there was always a rumor of coup linked to him until the army authority felt the concern to do something about it. He had large followings in both the army and public at large and was the most popular military commander during the war, apart from Obasanjo, who succeeded him and brought the war to an end with the same 3MC.

Adekunle led the Third Marine Commando Division with such great panache and determination that the foreign media, in looking for a human angle on the Biafran war, found him a ready source of news. He was a key champion of the food blockade to Biafra. In a wartime interview he had with Randolph Baumann of Stern Magazine in Igweocha (published on August 18, 1968), he stated.

Drop Your Comments Below

Continue Reading

Biography

Biograghy of Rashidi Adewolu Ladoja

Published

on

Rashidi Adewolu Ladoja (born 25 September 1944) is a businessman who became governor of Oyo State in Nigeria on 29 May 2003 as a member of the People’s Democratic Party (PDP). He was impeached in January 2006, but reinstated in December 2006. His term ended in 2007, and in 2008 he was charged with corruption during his period in office.

Early life

Rashidi Adewolu Ladoja was born on 25 September 1944 in Gambari village near Ibadan. He attended Ibadan Boys High School (1958–1963) and Olivet Baptist High School (1964–1965). He studied at the University of Liège, Belgium (1966–1972) where he earned a degree in Chemical Engineering. He obtained a job with Total Nigeria, an oil company, where he worked for 13 years in various positions before entering private business in 1985. His business interests include Shipping, Manufacturing, Banking, Agriculture and Transportation. He was elected to the Senate of Nigeria in 1993 during the short-lived Nigerian Third Republic. By 2000, Ladoja had become a director of Standard Trust Bank Limited.

Later career

On 28 August 2008, Ladoja was arrested by the Economic and Financial Crimes Commission (EFCC) over allegations of non-remittance of the proceeds of sale of government shares totaling N1.9 billion during his administration. He was briefly remanded in prison by the Federal High Court in Lagos on 30 August 2008. He was granted bail on 5 September in the amount of 100 million naira with two sureties for the same sum. In March 2009, a former aide testified on the way on which the share money had been divided between Ladoja’s family, bodyguard, senior politicians and lawyers.

In November 2009, Ladoja tried to persuade the local government chairmen sacked by his successor to withdraw a legal action they had started over their dismissal. This was said to be an attempt to make a deal that would result in a reduction of Ladoja’s sentence. However, 17 of the chairmen refused to withdraw their suit, saying “justice must be done”. Ladoja is currently the governorship candidate for Accord party in Oyo State; he is set to challenge the incumbent governor, Adebayo Alao Akala.

Drop Your Comments Below

Continue Reading

Trending